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20121120
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
, including the most important negotiating partner of all a, house speaker john boehner. >> the framework i've outlined in our meeting today is consistent with the president's call for a fair and balanced approach. >> i feel very good about what we were able to talk about in there. >> we're prepared to put revenue on the table, provided we fix the real problem. >> i feel confident that a solution may be in sight. >> and in terms of the nature of that solution, what was discussed in the meeting was a two-step process in which the leaders and the white house first agree on a framework, an amount of deficit reduction it, both tax increases and spending cuts, and then they kicked the filling in of those details into the early months of 2013. they would do that with a legislative mechanism that provides some assurance to the american people and to the financial markets, guys, that those blanks would be filled in by the time they need to to avoid the fiscal cliff. >> very big blanks. okay. thank you very much. david, a couple words we've heard here are hopeful and encouraged. are you feeling more
is there to do? the signals from john boehner, the speaker of the house, are that he's got some more leverage with his republican caucus than he had back in the day, and that there is talk of coming up with more revenue. maybe not calling it a tax increase, not a rate increase, but finding some way to raise some more money. >> right. you know, andrea, i hate to sound an optimistic note when it comes to politics, but i do think the signals coming out of john boehner's sort of world, and out of president obama's statement last week is that there can be some common ground here, that president obama, i think, clearly has some leverage due to what happened in the, in his own race, as well as at the senate level. so i think he has that. and then john boehner, i think a little bit more questionable in how much more leverage he has within his own caucus, but we shall see. if both of them can sort of say, look, let's do this, this is important to the country, let's move on, we can disagree about lots of other things, but we're going to compromise and move forward. whether that compromise is not raisin
back and forth. you had boehner's position from the -- >> i don't want to anger the viewers, you but i think they're looking at obama's words the same way they look it at the polls with the kind of sense of here's what i want to believe. >> if they lose, do they go along with that and say we will accept that or do they push it over the fiscal cliff. you have people on the right and the left who are saying go over. >> in the press conference yesterday, my read of what obama said was we're raising the rates and we're put a structure for eliminating entitlements. >> correct. but if we're talking about rates, if you were playing joe, you would hear that the argument would be that this will never actually work. republicans won't go loochialon it. so some people were suggesting maybe there is a way to do 35% and get rid of deductions. >> but remember was it geithner on -- today is thursday. so this would have been tuesday. he said people are diluting themselves to think we can get where we need to get with loopholes. and i don't know about the right max, but my understanding is i don't think
from john boehner and -- >> yeah, from boehner i am. the president has now painted himself -- painted those guys in to -- how many times has he drawn a line in the sand about that high right on 250. he's made a point and he can't possibly go back on that now, can he? >> i think he can. look, i think he's drawing a line on getting money from those people, there people making 250 and above. but he hasn't drawn a line on how he gets that money. he's said at his news conference i'm skeptical that you can do enough in loopholes and exclusions to get the money that we need for a deal from that group. but he also said i'm open to new ideas. so if there is in fact an effort to close some loopholes that gets you some of the way there, you can certainly see the president, i could anyway, compromising somewhere between 35 and 39.6 on a slightly higher rate. if shall be caomebody came up w source of revenue which didn't change the distribution of the tax burden, figure out a way to do it without a top rate. i kind of expect what's going to happen is loophole closing and you end up at like 37 ors
with boehner. but might be the beginning of bargain point. but you get 820 billion. so there's another 800 billion. at this point, the others are saying no cuts to medicare, social security, or anything else. and they have to find another 800 billion. >> the president did not say -- >> we know he has to cut some of those. >> my guess is the gop is saying they're looking at a trillion dollars as the number. >> and you saw what paul ryan said. the house was re-elected. so people re-elected those people in the house for a reason. it's a nonstarter. it's not going to happen. it's not going to be 1.6 billion. 1.6 trillion. to get to four trillion, that would be 2.4. so we said that. he'll go not 3-1 like simpson bowles. he's go one and a half to one. >> that's not going to happen either. >> but what bothers me -- >> the problem is nothing is going to happen. >> what bothers me is i do think you can get to a point where you raise taxes too much and you don't cut spending enough, where you're just funding entitlements by raising taxes and you don't do anything about it. if he had his way, i reall
think they've already agreed to that. you heard john boehner say that already. we've had voteses in the senate where we've gotten rid of tax credits. i think that's a given. and i think that the vast majority of measures agree with that. the question is how do you do that and how do you allow taxes to rise at the same time you fix the real problem and that's uncontrolled entitlement spending and a government that has grown massively. >> i think if the house stands for anything, it's cut government spending as tom coburn said and i think we'll have to do more of it. we heard the mandate in 2010 where it was a clear mandate cut spending and we did, we cut $900 billion in spending that he can't like painful tos us. >> we'll continue our call to rise bol politics and make a deal. oufr guests this morning include mike jackson and also david zaslav. and the head of maris group. and douglas holtz-eakin. >> let's talk about eurozone finance ministers meeting to discuss whether to release a new tranche of fund to go greece. the leaders are not expected it to okay the funding despite greec
can pass the alternative. but it's your problem to get the votes. and boehner would be well put not to try to cut a deal with obama but instead to say paul ryan's going to bring a solution to the fix, we're going to gather votes for it. i guarantee you, you'll get the right to have a democratic substitute. and if you can get enough republicans to vote for it, terrific. but they do not have an obligation to concede that the only mandate in washington is the president's. >> you're talking about chains hiring people for 29 hours. i'm hearing that from small business owners across pensacola. >> yeah. >> my own district. on election night i got three different e-mails from small business owners going it's sad -- and i said this on the air a couple days ago. they said i'm going to have to put these people on for less than 30 hours and i'm going to lose my best people. i can choose to do that or fire six, seven people because my margins are so small i'm fighting to keep my business open. >> you track the number of layoffs and closures in the first week since the election, it's sobering
can tell you that the guys in the house and boehner, they really want to do this, this limiting deductions, limiting loopholes, raising effective rates, but lowering nominal rates. they want to do it that way but the president may say no and those guys in the house will say no and we might, it might happen. >> it might, but look, this is a leadership moment. we have a a leader who now has second term. he's a president. he's a fascinating individual in many respects. he's part of the problem. >> what gives you any indication he'll lead in this case? >> maybe he'll wake up to the fact that he has a chance to cut through the polarization and leave a winning legacy. this is his chance to rise above. give him a button. >> there you go. thank you for that, steve. we have more ahead from steve. coming up, we're going to talk about several stocks on the move ahead of the opening bell. we'll get down to "mad money's" jim cramer. "squawk on the street," jim cramer right after this. sometimes investing opportunities are hard to spot. you have to dig a little. fidelity's etf market tracker
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)